How the Soviet Union disposed of captured German tanks after the war

How the Soviet Union disposed of captured German tanks after the war
How the Soviet Union disposed of captured German tanks after the war
Anonim
Image
Image

After the end of World War II, a huge amount of German military equipment, including tanks, fell into the hands of the Soviet Union. What fate awaited the machines developed by the German engineering genius? Was the fate of the German tanks captured at the end of the war somehow different from the fate of the vehicles that were taken throughout the rest of the conflict?

During the war, tanks were even used
During the war, tanks were even used

During the war years, the Red Army captured 24,000 German tanks and assault guns (ACS) as trophies. As a rule, German cars were sent for recycling in order to process them into metal for subsequent remelting. Samples of new military equipment were previously studied at Soviet institutes. In rare cases, captured vehicles remaining on the move were used for their intended purpose in tank units. For example, in the Red Army there were 307 "Panthers" in service, however, by 1945, no more than 111 remained on the move, and after the battles for Berlin and Konisberg, only 63 vehicles of this type remained operational.

The Red Army captured thousands of German vehicles
The Red Army captured thousands of German vehicles

After the end of the war, German tanks were mostly out of work. For several years after 1945, the Soviet army used captured Wehrmacht tanks as targets at shooting ranges. Until 1946, the deactivated (disarmed) tanks of Germany were used in the USSR as tracked tractors. However, as the wear and tear and in the absence of new spare parts, the already "seen all" machines were gradually sent to the scrap, to be melted down. Officially, by the end of 1946, not a single captured armored combat unit of German equipment was in service with the Soviet Army.

All these machines were to be scrapped
All these machines were to be scrapped

The fate of German captured tanks was somewhat different in the countries of the Eastern Bloc, which took shape after 1945 and the beginning of the Cold War. So, in Czechoslovakia, 167 German tanks were in service, of which 65 were "Panthers". They were used until 1955. Largely due to the fact that the same factories remained in Czechoslovakia that during the war years produced these same tanks for the Reich. In Bulgaria, about a hundred captured Panthers were converted into border pillboxes. Almost a hundred more captured Panthers were used by the French armed forces until 1950. Ultimately, all German armored vehicles in all countries were melted down, with the rare exception of individual copies that ended up in museums.

They were all disposed of
They were all disposed of

Continuing the topic, read about how the USSR tried to protect the T-34 using concrete blocks.

Popular by topic